Blowout Cards Forums
Advertise On Forum

Go Back   Blowout Cards Forums > BOX & CASE BREAKS > NON-SPORT BOX Breaks

NON-SPORT BOX Breaks Post your Non-Sports Box & Case Breaks Here!

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-30-2012, 06:58 PM   #1 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 277
Default Another case of Horrors of War!

Here's my 5th case of Horrors of War. I love this product (apparently):


Civil War - Thomas Claiborne (06.20.1823-06.02.1911) - May 27, 1846 appointed by President Polk as Second Lieutenant of Company D of the Mounted Rifles at beginning of the Mexican War. April 16, 1847 promoted to First Lieutenant and commanded S. H. Watkin's Company C participated in the attack at Cerro Gordo, Mexico. August, 1853 promoted to Captain. May 14, 1861 resigned his commission in the U.S. Army and offered his services to the Confederacy. 1861-1865 during the Civil War rose from the rank of captain to colonel while serving under the commands of Generals Joseph E. Johnston, Albert Sidney Johnston, P.T.G. Beauregard,
S. B. Buckner and E. Kirby Smith.


Korean War - Elmo Russell "Bud" Zumwalt, Jr. (11.29.20–01.02.00) - An American naval officer and the youngest man to serve as Chief of Naval Operations. As an admiral and later the 19th Chief of Naval Operations, Zumwalt played a major role in U.S. military history, especially during the Vietnam War. A highly-decorated war veteran, Zumwalt reformed U.S. Navy personnel policies in an effort to improve enlisted life and ease racial tensions. After he retired from a 32-year Navy career, he launched an unsuccessful campaign for the U.S. Senate.


Vietnam - Allen James Lynch (10.28.45) - Former United States Army soldier and a recipient of the United States military's highest decoration, the Medal of Honor, for his actions in the Vietnam War.


WWII - Archie Donahue - A legendary World War II Marine Corps fighter pilot who later was a key figure in the Confederate Air Force. Nationally known in military aviation circles as a triple ace, having shot down 16, possibly 17, Japanese warplanes — including five in one day — during his service in the Pacific. He was a retired Marine Corps colonel. "I got my wings three days before Pearl Harbor."

Claude Kinsey - A “flying sergeant” who became one of the earliest U.S. aces of World War II and who escaped a prisoner-of-war camp by walking 100 miles through Italy across German lines.

Ephraim P. Holmes (05.14.1908–02.23.97) - A four-star admiral in the United States Navy who served as commander in chief of the U.S. Atlantic Fleet and Supreme Allied Commander, Atlantic from 1967 to 1970. He was present on the signal bridge of the battleship Maryland during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, and later participated in the Battles of the Coral Sea and Midway.

Helmut Groß (12.27.1910–10.24.04) - A highly decorated Hauptmann (Captain) in the Wehrmacht (armed forces) during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognise extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership.

James B. Tapp - Extraordinary heroism in connection with military operations against an armed enemy while serving as Pilot of a P-51 Fighter Airplane in the 78th Fighter Squadron, 15th Fighter Group, SEVENTH Air Force, in aerial combat against enemy forces on 7 April 1945, during an air strike against Tokyo, Japan. As a fighter pilot during the first fighter-escorted B-29 mission over the Japanese Empire, Major Tapp displayed such heroism as to set him apart from his comrades. As the bombers approached the target, great numbers of enemy aircraft rose to intercept the formation. Major Tapp unhesitatingly engaged a large group of enemy fighter planes, destroying one and dispersing the others. Returning to the escort position, he observed a lone B-29 with two engines shot away, under attack by an enemy fighter. Instantly, Major Tapp sped to the bomber's defense and destroyed the attacking plane. The crippled bomber, with its small escort, was then attacked by a flight of eight enemy aircraft. Displaying extraordinary courage and airmanship, Major Tapp engaged the numerically superior enemy, destroying one and routing the others, preventing further damage to the distressed bomber. After the B-29's had released their bombs over the target, Major Tapp sighted another enemy aircraft. Giving chase, he again engaged the enemy to destroy his fourth enemy plane in approximately twelve minutes of combat. Major Tapp's outstanding display of courage aided the B-29 aircraft in accomplishing their mission. His unquestionable valor in aerial combat is in keeping with the highest traditions of the military service and reflects great credit upon himself, the 7th Air Force, and the United States Army Air Forces.

John Philip Weinel (02.23.1916-02.16.04) - An admiral in the U.S. Navy. From 1974 to 1977, he was a U.S. Military Representative to the NATO Military Committee. Prior to serving in this position, Weinel served in numerous administrative offices for the Navy in the Pentagon, among them, Director of Political-Military Affairs, Director of Strategic Plan, Assistant Deputy Chief of Naval Operations, Director of Plans for the Joint Chiefs of Staff and Assistant to the Chairman Joint Chiefs of Staff. He retired in 1975 and died in 2004.

Siegfried Fischer (11.27.1918–03.26.98) - A highly decorated Oberfeldwebel (Master Sergeant) in the Luftwaffe during World War II. He was also a recipient of the Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross. The Knight's Cross of the Iron Cross was awarded to recognize extreme battlefield bravery or successful military leadership. During his career he flew 713 missions, during which he was credited with the destruction of 80 tanks, and 15 aerial victories.Siegfried Fischer was captured by Soviet troops in April 1945 and was held captive until September 1946.
Attached Thumbnails
Another case of Horrors of War!-img-20120330-00419.jpg   Another case of Horrors of War!-img-20120330-00422.jpg   Another case of Horrors of War!-img-20120330-00426.jpg   Another case of Horrors of War!-img-20120330-00427.jpg   Another case of Horrors of War!-img-20120330-00430.jpg  


Last edited by YakuzaShoeii; 03-31-2012 at 09:29 AM.
YakuzaShoeii is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2012, 08:07 PM   #2 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Location: Virginia, USA
Posts: 54
Default

Congratulations, I like the Zumwalt cut signature. The US Navy's new destroyer, the DDG-1000 is named after him.
Attached Thumbnails
Another case of Horrors of War!-ddg1000-01.jpg  
ali_ufc_cards is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2012, 10:42 PM   #3 (permalink)
Member
 
Nuuk's Avatar
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: Svalbard
Posts: 511
Default

Can't get enough of these breaks and the history involved in them. Cool pic of the Luftwaffe cross in the pic of the Fischer card.
__________________
PC: Penn State players in their PSU uniforms. Especially foil parallels, inserts, autos.
Nuuk is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-30-2012, 11:51 PM   #4 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 3,466
Default

Out of all the Horrors of War I opened, the one cut I regret selling the most was Gunther Rall(heck I pulled the Saddam, Audie Murphy and Joseph Hooker for bigger names), Luftwaffe ace who flew 621 missions and had the 3rd most victories ever with 275! Relax, 241 of them were Russians on the Eastern Front and he was shot down 8 times himself. Here are some pictures I found of him to pep up my ebay auction back then He's third in line getting his Cross from the Chancellor of Germany This product made me do tons of research on the signatures and I have so much more appreciation and empathy for what those men had to do when their Countries asked them to.
coltsnsox07 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-31-2012, 08:28 AM   #5 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2012
Posts: 277
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by coltsnsox07 View Post
This product made me do tons of research on the signatures and I have so much more appreciation and empathy for what those men had to do when their Countries asked them to.
I started off by buying one single pack. After researching (wiki) the guy (Henry Schauer) and reading his Medal of Honor citation, it really put a whole new perspective on everything I thought of war. I bought three more single packs then a master...and now another 10pk. I will probably wind up holding onto everything for a while. I didn't think I would become so attached, however, it has become very difficult to decide to sell any. The only word I can use to describe these cuts is POWERFUL. It's unlike opening any regular pack of sports cards.

Last edited by YakuzaShoeii; 03-31-2012 at 09:16 AM.
YakuzaShoeii is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 03:48 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO
Copyright © 2013, Blowout Cards Inc.