Blowout Cards Forums
Advertise On Forum

Go Back   Blowout Cards Forums > BLOWOUTS HOBBY TALK > RACING, GOLF & OTHER SPORTS

RACING, GOLF & OTHER SPORTS Post your Other Sports Hobby Talk

Reply
 
LinkBack Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 05-15-2013, 10:03 AM   #76 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 670
Default

Worldwide, I'd venture to guess that pro wrestling is watched by more people than quite a few of the major American sports. Even in the US, Raw has a larger national audience consistently above almost every other regular season sporting event except for football. I wouldn't argue pro wrestling is currently more popular than football, basketball or baseball overall in the US, but I'd say it gives hockey a run for its money (and hockey does quite well as a stand alone sports card product).

I do think the wrestling card market is more limited, but so far the number of cards produced has been relatively limited as well. Buying a star player autograph card in any other sports is no longer what it once was. Almost any guy can be picked up for under $50.00, with quite a few $10.00 or less, so wrestling seems neither incredibly overpriced or under priced at this point. Is the older wrestling card market currently artificially inflated by a select few people who got in early and pushed the market up on Ebay only after they bought up nearly every older card on the cheap? Possibly, but I think that happens in nearly every other sporting card market as well. The whole 90's insert basketball phenomenon seemed to be started by a few people who finally convinced the rest of the hobby to come along for the ride with them. Can anyone rationally explain the Panini Prizm phenomenon the last year?

So in short, I see the point RBI is trying to make and he's right to some extent this market can't hold if the production numbers get too high particularly on autographs of certain guys, but I don't think we've hit that point yet with at least the "on card" wrestling autographs. In fact, it's the sticker market that I think is suffering tremendously now in all sports as the manufacturers have pumped out so many sticker cards in the last 5 years it's really impossible to give any more substantial value to one sticker over the next.

Were I to pick a market in wrestling that's iffy to me though, I'd say it's the hand cut and paper cards from magazines that's taken off in the last year. I can't fathom in any other card market that unlicensed cards people could tear out of magazine or cut by their own hand with a razor blade or scissors in their basement would be considered authentic grade-able true valuable rookie cards. At best, they'd be considered odd ball cards. And magazine cards on paper stock I can't imagine holding much value at all in any other sport.
bullingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 12:24 PM   #77 (permalink)
Member
 
sjim8660's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,265
Default

You can thank the popularity of the magazine cards to a lack of companies making cards in the 70's and 80's. Topps only did 85 series 1 & 2 (OPC), 87 1 series. Thats all they did for the wwf in the 80's. You have the wonderama set in the late 80's but thats all. I wish they would of done more. The 85 all star set (Magazine set) is actually pretty nice, paper thin, but still nice cards. You do have some oddball sets like the carnation set and Market scene, but nothing that you can get a wax box for. I do enjoy the chase that not very many hobbies offer, without having to spend thousands per card to build a set.
sjim8660 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 04:33 PM   #78 (permalink)
Member
 
sthoemke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 2,383
Default

I've been a huge wrestling card collector for over 15 years. Almost everything has dried up or increase dramatically in value. Stand-alone sets, wax, anything vintage, odd/food isues, even ameatuer/olympic type cards.

The only thing that hasn't panned out as an investment is 1991 Impel, and even then you can piece out the Sting/Flair cards and make your money back.
__________________
Signature goes here
sthoemke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 04:56 PM   #79 (permalink)
Member
 
sjim8660's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,265
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by sthoemke View Post
I've been a huge wrestling card collector for over 15 years. Almost everything has dried up or increase dramatically in value. Stand-alone sets, wax, anything vintage, odd/food isues, even ameatuer/olympic type cards.

The only thing that hasn't panned out as an investment is 1991 Impel, and even then you can piece out the Sting/Flair cards and make your money back.
Some of the 1991 impel cards recently sold decent, sting/flair cards. They were graded by PSA, they still pulled some interest.
sjim8660 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 07:05 PM   #80 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 670
Default

The lack of any movement on the Impel cards in 22 years tells me either (a) they produced a boatload of them or (b) the people who had/have the ability to drive the "vintage" wrestling market up have deliberately chose not to support that set. If I recall correctly from when I bought it as a kid, the set has the first *wrestling* cards produced of Brian Pillman, Arn Anderson (as a solo act), Sid, Jim Ross, and Scott Steiner (among others). It also has a ton of Flairs and Stings in the primes of their career. As such, you would think on that alone it would be worth something, but you can still get a whole box for under $10.00 which is exactly what I paid at a discount at KB Toy Store 20 odd years ago.

Last edited by bullingham; 05-15-2013 at 07:10 PM.
bullingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 07:08 PM   #81 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,845
Default

Impel was just really ugly and the fact that it had several base cards of each wrestler probably didnt help. They are all still collecting dust along with th3 ghostbusters 2 and batman returns boxes
geoffyb is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 07:15 PM   #82 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 670
Default

Lol, I remember those other boxes too. I can't imagine it just being the ugly design (though I don't think it helps), but yes, the multiple cards of each guy holds down the value for sure. With that said, you'd think the cards would still be worth more than a couple pennies a piece. WCW wasn't exactly popularity wise the WWF in those days, so you'd have to think the product was slightly more limited than the Topps 1980's sets.
bullingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 07:39 PM   #83 (permalink)
Member
 
sthoemke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 2,383
Default

Impel was simply overproduced. I wouldn't consider it a poorly design set, but the colors were somewhat gimmicky. Impel never really promoted, and it competed with a more "mature" Championship Marketing WCW set of the same year. At that time, the 1985 and 1987 Topps sets were still "horribly" cheap, and the 1990/1991 Classic sets also had substantual production.

I doubt the Impel cards will ever be worth anything other than sold in inexpensive lots, or the some singles pieced out cheaply.

I still think the Sting cards are pretty cool, as cheap as they are.
__________________
Signature goes here
sthoemke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 07:53 PM   #84 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 670
Default

I wonder what the production numbers for 91 Impel. I remember KB Toys was always trying to get rid of them by the box load for cheap in the early 90's, along with Line Drive Minor League baseball. I of course bought several boxes thinking they'd be rare first cards of some guys some day, but that and my late 80's Topps baseball and 1990 Score football purchases never paid off lol. I remember thinking I'd found the steal of the century when I found 1990 Score factory football sets for a mere 8.00 a piece in the early 1990's at various retailers. All those rookies,! I think they are worth less now!
bullingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 08:06 PM   #85 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 670
Default

As far as the magazine cards, I understand that not much else was produced during that time (and for a collector/investor that's kind of a good thing), but there's just something weird about cards going for a lot of money/being graded by PSA that people cut themselves.
bullingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-15-2013, 11:06 PM   #86 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 935
Default

You can make the case that a few are distorting the market and that is true of every type of trading card that is collected.

It is no different with wrestling cards.

That being said the base level of the market has increased dramatically and there are bids that are strong under the market.

I purchased another Junkyard Dog PSA 9 tonight and there were four bids of $125 or higher. For trading cards of a niche like wrestling I would consider that a deep market.

It is obvious that someone like me wants to own many copies of the best cards and it is no different then some of the other collectors on this board who want multiples of the Leaf product or something similar.

The hoarder or super collector as some have referenced is a factor in every market.

Where RBI is entirely off is the big cards of the hobby that are driven by other collectors.

A high grade Hulk Hogan appeals to the masses and that is what makes that card so valuable. You are not dealing with just wrestling card collectors. The high grade card collector is now your rival.

He is also off in the broadening of the market. Yes it is true that many cards will never achieve the prices they would if they were from a major sport but the gains have been quite impressive and the current prices are a fraction of what they would be due to the scarcity and condition sensitivity of major sports.

I think it would be foolish to think wrestling cards could ever achieve the prices of the other major sports but the gap is still so huge with the rare cards that it is still so affordable that this will attract further interest.

You have cards that are actually rare from the 1980's. I am not sure why but at this point it seems the 1986 Carnation Major League Wrestling Rick Martel and The Road Warriors was either short printed or more got thrown away as they never surface. If you look at the PSA population report it is clear that there are quite a few less that exist then the other four cards in the set. This right here is what is exciting about wrestling cards. If the same existed for a baseball card it would be 10's of thousands. Instead it is hundreds.

There will continue to be up surges and down surges but the trend is higher for wrestling cards. There are so many great sets that exist and it is certain in my mind that more collectors will begin to chase the cards.

Supply and demand for each set will naturally differ but on the margin I believe you will continue to see stiff competition for many wrestling cards.

Last edited by dpeck100; 05-15-2013 at 11:14 PM.
dpeck100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 02:07 AM   #87 (permalink)
Member
 
bootan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 492
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dpeck100 View Post

I purchased another Junkyard Dog PSA 9 tonight and there were four bids of $125 or higher. For trading cards of a niche like wrestling I would consider that a deep market.


thanks dpeck, that was me you outbid today

It is obvious that someone like me wants to own many copies of the best cards and it is no different then some of the other collectors on this board who want multiples of the Leaf product or something similar.

nup, I just want one.....arghhhhh
btw was that a good price for a PSA 9 JYD???
__________________
http://s1188.beta.photobucket.com/user/bootan40/library/Wrestling-for-trade-and-sale
bootan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 02:11 AM   #88 (permalink)
Member
 
sthoemke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 2,383
Default

I see the following factors leading to an increase in popularity of wrestling cards (in no specific order)

- increased awareness/promotion by price guides (ie Beckett)
- increased awareness of graded cards
- huge TV audience (including an increasing global audience)
- emergence of the "rookie card" factor
- popularity of divas/girl wrestlers
- increase of nostalgia/history of the sport
- the new hall-of-fames
- increase in TV/movie roles for wrestlers
- super-collectors
- the "investment" factor
- the chase for odd/obscure/rare cards
- innovation of product
- emergance of "icons" and interest of deceased wrestlers (autograph chasing, etc)

Am I leaving anything out?
__________________
Signature goes here
sthoemke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 07:47 AM   #89 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 935
Default

It is lower then the last two but much higher then where it was a few years ago.

I will now have 4 of 7 and the only PSA 10 too.

What is nice is that I self subbed 2 of those 9's and the only 10.


Here is the PSA 10.


dpeck100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 08:19 AM   #90 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 935
Default

Steve I don't think you left anything out.

To me a huge part of the driving force behind the move higher is the emergence of the rookie card factor and grading as you pointed out.

One of my main arguments years ago that the Wrestling All Stars would explode in price was the lack of supply in strong condition and my doubt that a huge amount would surface. In the example above with JYD, there are only 8 cards ever graded by PSA Mint or higher. The grading element proves how scarce they are in such high quality condition that it forces the market to pay a premium for the cards. There is no doubt that if there were 50 cards or 100 cards or 1000 cards in that condition the prices would be much lower.

The rookie card factor has played a huge role in the move higher for wrestling cards. Take for example the 1992 WCW Steve Austin card that is on the move in recent months. There is only one to choose from. There are not 15 brands produced from that year where people can pick and choose which one they like most. Nope just one. I looked for two months for a card to surface and only had a shot at two of them. One sold in auction for $71 and the other was the set I purchased for $29.99. I know which magazine in 1993 these were issued in and I have never seen one copy of it ever listed on EBAY in the four or five months I have been looking. Once again we get back to supply and there is just not much of it.

One of the next cards that I think is going to go for big money graded is a 1992 WCW UK Diamond Stud. There have yet to be any graded by PSA and this is my next target. I have purchased some of these and plan to submit them to PSA. Try finding a niche of cards where a star players rookie card has never been graded. Good luck finding one other then wrestling.
dpeck100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 09:06 AM   #91 (permalink)
Member
 
sjim8660's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2013
Location: Virginia
Posts: 1,265
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by dpeck100 View Post
Steve I don't think you left anything out.

To me a huge part of the driving force behind the move higher is the emergence of the rookie card factor and grading as you pointed out.

One of my main arguments years ago that the Wrestling All Stars would explode in price was the lack of supply in strong condition and my doubt that a huge amount would surface. In the example above with JYD, there are only 8 cards ever graded by PSA Mint or higher. The grading element proves how scarce they are in such high quality condition that it forces the market to pay a premium for the cards. There is no doubt that if there were 50 cards or 100 cards or 1000 cards in that condition the prices would be much lower.

The rookie card factor has played a huge role in the move higher for wrestling cards. Take for example the 1992 WCW Steve Austin card that is on the move in recent months. There is only one to choose from. There are not 15 brands produced from that year where people can pick and choose which one they like most. Nope just one. I looked for two months for a card to surface and only had a shot at two of them. One sold in auction for $71 and the other was the set I purchased for $29.99. I know which magazine in 1993 these were issued in and I have never seen one copy of it ever listed on EBAY in the four or five months I have been looking. Once again we get back to supply and there is just not much of it.

One of the next cards that I think is going to go for big money graded is a 1992 WCW UK Diamond Stud. There have yet to be any graded by PSA and this is my next target. I have purchased some of these and plan to submit them to PSA. Try finding a niche of cards where a star players rookie card has never been graded. Good luck finding one other then wrestling.
Collecting wrestling cards that are rare and in good condition is a challenge. But the amazing thing is that what the rare cards sell for is not expensive. When people realize that these cards are collectible and rare and the demand starts to grow, these cards like the 1992 Topps wcw set (Mainly scott hall's cards) are going to sky rocket and stay high. I have a few of his 1992 cards, that I plan to send to PSA, I am personally a wrestling card set builder. I build graded (PSA Only) sets. I have a few on the registry I am trying to finish and when I do I will be doing a 1992 topps WCW set on the registry.
sjim8660 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 09:15 AM   #92 (permalink)
Member
 
Krayzie83's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 1,004
Default

I think the only thing missing from the list of reasons in the newly sparked wrestling interest is Leaf Originals. The set brought many new collectors into the wrestling scene, I for one being one of them. Literally had 0 interest in wrassling cards until this set of childhood heroes dropped and I'm certain I'm not the only one. As for wrestling card rookies, is there any definitive list or site that lists what's who's first?
__________________
Actively Pursuing:
-Baseball, Basketball, Football Inscription Autographs
-Rare or Autographed Fred Taylor cards
-Kobe & Kevin Garnett Autos, Inserts & Graded cards
Krayzie83 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 03:58 PM   #93 (permalink)
Member
 
sthoemke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 2,383
Default

There are wrestling checklist sites, but no definative list for "rookie" cards. It is really subjective, with different card-types and manufacturers. Many wrestlers have multiple cards from thier first year, as well.
__________________
Signature goes here
sthoemke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 04:07 PM   #94 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 670
Default

Leaf Originals definitely re-sparked my interest in the wrestling cards of my youth. Unfortunately, it destroyed some of it pretty quickly with the whole Scott hall red ink fiasco which served to remind me just how shady this hobby has been and always will be, but that's another story.

With that said, I think the number one reason for much of the sudden meteoric rise of certain older wrestling cards is market manipulation (as it always has been in this hobby). People who already had bought a lot of these cards over the years with really nowhere to dump them, pushed over and over and over again, to anyone who'd listen, these cards (along with the typical Ebay shilling that goes on in the early stages) and finally it caught on with enough people that the market took on a life of its own. The only thing missing is Don West and Eddie Lewis to shill the magic on live tv every night like back in the 80's/early 90's with Chong Modesto A's McGwire cards, Griffey Jr. Mothers Cookies specials, Beanie Babies, 1987 Topps "rookie" cards and the like.

Anyone remember the Tiger Wood's Grand Slam cards that took off out of nowhere 10-15 years ago? I remember these things sitting around at my small town local Wal Mart, by the dozens at a substantial discount. No one wanted them or cared. Someone must have got a hold of a bunch of them however with the right connections in the hobby because seemingly overnight that card was selling for a small fortune. No one has really collected golf before or since.

Were wrestling cards undervalued? Absolutely. Wrestling has always been a much bigger "sport" than the average member of the American sports media would have you believe. Are they valued about right, right now? Will they continue to go up? Who knows. This is the part where market manipulation eventually dies and the market does whatever it wants to do. On the plus side, relatively speaking, the cards are quite rare relative to other sports and there are a number of 80's and 90's wrestling fans coming of age. On the negative side, it's wrestling and that still holds a negative connotation with a significant portion of the public.
bullingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 04:09 PM   #95 (permalink)
Member
 
sthoemke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 2,383
Default

I'd also add:

- new sets/manufactures spark interest in the hobby (unlike baseball or basketball with only 1 licensed company)
- continual new talent to the sport
- the massive depth of personalities, both past and present
- celebrity crossovers into the sport (guess hosts, etc)
- new champions/pay-per-views/evolving plotlines ("soap opera effects")
__________________
Signature goes here
sthoemke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 06:58 PM   #96 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 935
Default

There is no market manipulation going with older wrestling cards.

If a few people decide they want to own a lot of the cards of a certain set they are simply active market participants.

I had no choice but to buy up a ton of the cards in pursuit of the greatest wrestling sets I could put together. You have to have numerous copies to find NM-MT cards let alone Mint or Gem Mint. I bought 35 sets of the OPC Series II looking for nice Randy Savage cards. I still own them all.

There are no dealers in on this. They listed them and let them fly. Dealers are profit seekers and they saw an opportunity to get the cards graded and have me and others fight over them.

If someone like me bids who has zero bid retractions and has paid for every item they have ever won without question bids on many items it is just part of the market flow.

Is this a market distortion? Yes it is as is the case with many types of cards. The advent of the hoarder has changed the card market. You can not simply bank on the idea that collectors simply want to own one copy. I view cards like stocks. If you find a winner you want to own a lot of shares.

The idea that I had no where to dump them and this is what has caused me to continue buying is ludicrous.

I have had no interest in selling.

What I throw up on EBAY from time to time is a pittance of what I own and has no bearing on my outlook for any cards.

There was already a huge storm brewing with the Wrestling All Stars and when the SMR article hit they exploded. This is just part of the natural flow of the card market. What I find so amusing is that the recent PSA 9 Hulk Hogan's that sold on EBAY, I was $850 and $1,650 away from the winning bid. My bids were immaterial to the outcome. When the Hogan card first took off Chris Olds wrote in Becket that is was EBAY dealers playing games. No it was me buying them at any price as I felt confident the card was going to move higher.

I have said from day one I am not done buying and my stance has not changed and won't change.

I like having the cards and there is nothing that will change that fact.
dpeck100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-16-2013, 07:31 PM   #97 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Posts: 670
Default

Huh?

You don't have to sell much of anything to artificially pump up any type of market when the time is right. A smart buyer finds something relatively rare/undervalued, buys as much as he/she can of them at a dirt cheap price, and then and only then starts to shout from the rooftops what a rare and unique item he/she owns in quantity and keeps on and keeps on. Sometimes it catches on with others, sometimes it flames out. Sometimes people hold what they already have, sometimes people sell, sometimes people keep buying, but no one pumps a market for pure love of the hobby. I give you full credit, I wish I had thought of it, vintage wrestling was completely untapped in trading cards, so this is not a slam, just my perception of what has happened in the last few years. If this was truly all done naively with no profit motive somewhere at the end of the tunnel in mind, that would be a first in this hobby, but it's still price manipulation in the sense no one was buying these cards a few years ago, I dare say most didn't even know they existed, and only after they started to get pumped up by a few people everywhere in sight did the vintage wrestling market take off. It's happened before, it'll happen again, at some point when all the hyping is over, the market decides if it's just a fad or a long term thing.

By the way, my previous post wasn't addressed just at you, nor just at the 1982 All Star set, people are still pumping in here as we speak their own deals.

Last edited by bullingham; 05-16-2013 at 11:56 PM.
bullingham is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 12:58 AM   #98 (permalink)
Member
 
sthoemke's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Location: Santa Rosa, CA
Posts: 2,383
Default

There are a lot of niche markets within the wrestling card hobby.

It doesn't take much for for a certain card or set, unopened wax of a given series, or even a given wrestler to have the market quantity dry up in a short period of time.
__________________
Signature goes here
sthoemke is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 03:01 AM   #99 (permalink)
Member
 
bootan's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 492
Default

Quote:
Originally Posted by bullingham View Post
Huh?

You don't have to sell much of anything to artificially pump up any type of market when the time is right. A smart buyer finds something relatively rare/undervalued, buys as much as he/she can of them at a dirt cheap price, and then and only then starts to shout from the rooftops what a rare and unique item he/she owns in quantity and keeps on and keeps on. Sometimes it catches on with others, sometimes it flames out. Sometimes people hold what they already have, sometimes people sell, sometimes people keep buying, but no one pumps a market for pure love of the hobby. I give you full credit, I wish I had thought of it, vintage wrestling was completely untapped in trading cards, so this is not a slam, just my perception of what has happened in the last few years. If this was truly all done naively with no profit motive somewhere at the end of the tunnel in mind, that would be a first in this hobby, but it's still price manipulation in the sense no one was buying these cards a few years ago, I dare say most didn't even know they existed, and only after they started to get pumped up by a few people everywhere in sight did the vintage wrestling market take off. It's happened before, it'll happen again, at some point when all the hyping is over, the market decides if it's just a fad or a long term thing.

By the way, my previous post wasn't addressed just at you, nor just at the 1982 All Star set, people are still pumping in here as we speak their own deals.

I agree with you bullingham this is exactly what has happened with the all-stars set. I for one am a wrestling collector that did not know anything about this cards until I stumbled upon some of dpecks posts.

I loved the idea of some of my childhood favourites "rookie" cards and took a liking to the 3 sets. But do I think they warrant the price explosion?? not really. I think the prices will slow down eventually as the fad wears out. Recent auctions show this already. The most prized card from all 3 sets obviously is the Hogan. 2 PSA 9s have gone off in the last couple of months. One sold for $2400 odd, the other just weeks ago for $1700 odd. Thats is a massive disparity just there. In my opinion I dont think there are too many wrestling collectors buying this set (I notice the same bidders over and over again).

The thing with these cards are no one really wants them ungraded, whereas cards like wcw topps autos still fetch big money ungraded. Anything under a PSA 9 is basically worthless in the all-stars sets.

Im hoping more and more of these all-stars set gets graded, bringing the pops up and the prices down, I for one would love to have a complete set...........but not at these prices.
__________________
http://s1188.beta.photobucket.com/user/bootan40/library/Wrestling-for-trade-and-sale
bootan is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 05-17-2013, 08:20 AM   #100 (permalink)
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Orlando, FL
Posts: 935
Default

The population of stronger cards from the 1983 set has exploded in the past 18 months but you can't say the same thing about the 1982 A and 1982 B. Many of these cards have already re adjusted like Curt Henning and a few others as there are plenty to choose from in nice condition.

You used to be able to find really nice raw cards on EBAY but for the most part people send them in to be graded first and if there was a ton of high quality cards from those two sets we would have seen a big pick up in the number of cards graded.

I check the PSA population report every day and I am familiar with the issues that plague every card in the set. Unless someone uncovers a ton of sealed sets from the 82 A and B there is really no chance that we will see some large spike in high grade cards from those two sets.

I sent in my first cards to PSA in April of 2010 and one of the cards I got was a PSA 9 Mint Dusty Rhodes. Three years later there are only two more that have surfaced. This is why some of the cards go for big money in strong condition.

I purchased my first of three Hogan PSA 9's for roughly $50 in 2009 so yes the market has come a long way. That being said to see sales of this card of $1,803 and $2,650 is tremendous and speaks volumes to the demand for these sets. The population of Hogan's in this grade have only increased 5 cards in the three years I have been getting these graded and this has happened in the face of literally 3,000 new cards getting graded from all three sets by PSA. Are there more out there? Most likely but not a lot.

The reason many of these cards do so well in high grade is they are just not abundant and when you have the existing supply locked up in collections it restricts supply even further. In the case of Dusty Rhodes I own 4 of the top 5 cards in the PSA population report so it creates an even further shortage.

To suggest that the only cards people want are in graded form is simply not accurate. Many sets of these have sold on EBAY for strong prices in raw form. Yes there is a huge price disparity between the various grades of each card and that holds true for any set of cards that is actively submitted for grading. People want to own the best so if a card has supply in Mint or Gem Mint it is natural for a lower grade card to sell for less. There are plenty of the cards in PSA 8 NM-MT that bring strong prices. I sold a Junkyard Dog PSA 8 for $75 in the past six months and there are cards like Ricky Steamboat that have sold for $70. To me these are great prices.
dpeck100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Bookmarks

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are On
Pingbacks are On
Refbacks are On



All times are GMT -4. The time now is 11:15 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.7
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO
Copyright 2013, Blowout Cards Inc.